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Kate Cahoy uses her substantial class action experience to help clients develop strategic and innovative solutions to their most challenging litigation matters. She specializes in defending clients in complex, high-stakes class action disputes involving privacy, antitrust, and consumer protection claims and has achieved significant victories for clients in the technology, entertainment, consumer product, and financial services industries. In addition, Kate has substantial experience litigating cases brought under California’s Section 17200 and other consumer protection, competition, and privacy laws, including the Sherman Act, California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), California Invasion of Privacy Act (CIPA), Wiretap Act, Stored Communications Act, Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), Video Privacy Protection Act (VPPA), and common law and constitutional rights of privacy, among others.

A magistrate judge in the Western District of New York recently recommended dismissing the putative class action Tassmer et al v. Professional Business Systems, concluding that any risk of identity theft or other injury was too “speculative” to show standing.  The recommendation is in line with numerous other federal circuit and district courts similarly requiring plaintiffs in data breach cases to show concrete harm, not merely a risk of future harm.  This recommendation, if adopted, will be another helpful precedent for companies facing class action lawsuits as a result of a data breach or cyber hack.

Continue Reading No Harm, No Foul: New York Federal Court Recommends Dismissing Sensitive Data Breach Class Action for Lack of Standing

A California federal district court recently granted partial dismissal of privacy claims brought by several Google users in Rodriguez v. Google, LLC, No. 20-cv-5688 (N.D. Cal.).  The Rodriguez plaintiffs claimed that Google engaged in unlawful wiretapping under section 631 of the California Invasion of Privacy Act (“CIPA”) by collecting data from third-party apps after users turned off certain data tracking in their Google privacy settings; they also claimed that Google breached a unilateral contract they had formed by selecting those privacy settings.  The court disagreed, and dismissed these two claims without leave to amend.  

Continue Reading Court Grants Dismissal of Wiretapping and Contract Claims in Putative Privacy Class Action Involving Google Privacy Settings