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John Graubert has more than 30 years of experience in a wide range of complex antitrust and consumer law matters. John came to the firm after serving for ten years as Principal Deputy General Counsel of the Federal Trade Commission. John is co-chair of the firm’s Advertising and Consumer Protection practice group, an Adjunct Professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, and a vice-chair of the Federal Civil Enforcement Committee of the ABA Antitrust Section.

From 1998-2008, John served as Principal Deputy General Counsel (including several stints as Acting General Counsel) at the Federal Trade Commission. In that position John managed all litigation, legal counsel, policy studies, and administrative functions within the Office of General Counsel. He also advised the Commission and agency staff on antitrust and consumer protection matters and administrative law. He was involved in dozens of litigated matters for the Commission, including FTC v. Swedish Match, et al. (D.D.C. 2000) and FTC v. Schering-Plough, et al. (11th Cir. 2005), and received the A. Leon Higginbotham Award and the Award for Distinguished Service.

A recent class action filed in federal court against YouTube is the latest in a growing list of class actions against companies regarding their automatic renewal practices.

The suit alleges that YouTube and its parent company Google (together, “YouTube”) failed to provide the requisite disclosures and authorizations in connection with their subscription services, including YouTube TV, YouTube Music, and YouTube Premium, as required by Oregon’s Automatic Renewal Law (“ARL”) and in violation of Oregon’s Unlawful Trade Practices Act (“UTPA”).  See Walkingeagle, et al. v. Google LLC, et al., No. 3:22-cv-763 (D. Or.).  According to the complaint, YouTube enjoyed rapid growth in their user-base by employing “dark patterns” in their user interfaces to “trick” users into doing things they might not otherwise do, including signing up for recurring services (and bills).

Continue Reading YouTube Hit with Auto-Renewal Suit Over Its Online Subscriptions Services